ET is an ode on childhood say UPI

“E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial,” one of the most commercially successful films ever made celebrates its 30th anniversary Monday. Fans can purchase a special Blu-Ray edition of the film this fall.

“You could be happy here, I could take care of you. I wouldn’t let anybody hurt you. We could grow up together, E.T,” says Elliot, the lonely, imaginative main character of Steven Spielberg’s pop culture juggernaut, “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial,” encapsulating the spirit of a movie that’s essentially about finding your place in the world, about growing up.

Spielberg’s emotional, magical tearjerker captured the imagination of millions of moviegoers in 1982, and is still widely considered one of the best movies of all time.

The film follows Elliot and his younger sister Gertie as they discover and befriend an alien stranded on Earth. In their attempts to help E.T. return home, Elliot and Gertie evade the men and women of the nation’s military-industrial complex hoping to use the alien for their own sinister and greedy purposes.

A predecessor to films like “WALL-E” and “Super 8,” “E.T.” approached alien-centric movie-making from the point of view of its young characters, who regard E.T. with wide-eyed wonderment and friendship. In a world where grown ups are as alien to them as any creature from a foreign planet, Elliot and Gertie see E.T. as a lonely soul they can identify with, who just wants to find his way home.

“What’s perhaps most amazing about “E.T.,” Salon critic Charles Taylor wrote in 2002, “is its ability to put an audience under a spell of childlike wonderment without infantilizing it.”

“This comforting fantasy, made by a man who could still remember what it was like to feel like a hurt child, is really about leaving the reassurance of childhood behind.”

A predecessor to films like “WALL-E” and “Super 8,” “E.T.” approached alien-centric movie-making from the point of view of its young characters, who regard E.T. with wide-eyed wonderment and friendship. In a world where grown ups are as alien to them as any creature from a foreign planet, Elliot and Gertie see E.T. as a lonely soul they can identify with, who just wants to find his way home.

“What’s perhaps most amazing about “E.T.,” Salon critic Charles Taylor wrote in 2002, “is its ability to put an audience under a spell of childlike wonderment without infantilizing it.”

“This comforting fantasy, made by a man who could still remember what it was like to feel like a hurt child, is really about leaving the reassurance of childhood behind.”

Read more: http://www.upi.com/blog/2012/06/11/ETs-30th-Anniversary-A-look-back-at-Steven-Spielbergs-ode-to-childhood/5751339441905/#ixzz1yAuIfXJX

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